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Top 10 Chinese buzzwords in 2019

By Zhang Rui
0 Comment(s)Print E-mail China.org.cn, December 31, 2019
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8. "It's too hard for me" (“我太難/南了”)

A screen shot of the original video where the internet celebrity Brother Giao cries out "Wo Tai Nan Le." [Photo/ China.org.cn]

"Wo Tai Nan Le," meaning "it's too hard for me" or "I am burned out," is a phrase first appeared in an online video on the short video platform Kuaishou where a man nicknamed Brother Giao is seen hiding his frown behind his hands, almost crying and saying: "Wo Tai Nan Le. I have been under a lot of pressure lately, my friend." The video went viral, and even a series of animated emojis were created. Chinese internet users sometimes used "南" (meaning "south") to replace "難" ("hard") in their communications, as the two characters in Chinese have the same pronunciation. Use of the wrongly written word to convey the same feeling makes things even more hilarious. The term exploded on the internet as it resonated with ordinary people living in a fast-paced urban life under great pressure.

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